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Historical properties in Waterdown receive heritage designation

Historical properties in Waterdown receive heritage designation

Several historic houses in Waterdown have now received a heritage designation. The designation means that a heritage permit will be required if the owner proposes alteration to the buildings. A staff report in February indicated there was no opposition from the owners. With the passage of bylaws this month designating the properties, there is still an opportunity to file an objection. The owners of designated properties are eligible to apply for loans and grants to maintain the heritage features of the properties.

Following is a list of the properties for which designation by-laws have been passed.

289 Dundas Street East

The property located at 289 Dundas Street East, known as the Smith-Carson House, is comprised of a two-storey brick dwelling constructed circa 1885.  The historical value of the property lies in its association with three prominent families in Waterdown, the Cummer family, the Smith family and the Carson family. 

292 Dundas Street East

The property located at 292 Dundas Street East, known as Maple Lawn, is comprised of a two-storey brick dwelling converted into a commercial building believed to have been constructed in 1887.  The historical value of the property lies in its direct association with two locally significant people, George Allison (1841-1926), a farmer and local magistrate; and George Harold Greene (1874-1960), the first publisher of the Waterdown Review. The cultural heritage value of the property also lies in its design value as a late-nineteenth century farm house influenced by the Gothic Revival and Italianate architectural styles.  The physical value of the property also lies in its high degree of craftsmanship and artistic merit demonstrated through the decorative bargeboard Gothic-influenced high-pitched gables; bay windows with Italianate bracket detailing.

The property located at 298 Dundas Street East, known as the Former New Connexion Methodist Church and the Maycock House, is comprised of a two-storey stone building originally constructed as a church circa 1859.  The cultural heritage value of the property lies in its association with the Methodist Church.  The New Connexion Methodists purchased the property in 1859 and built the church, before uniting with the Wesleyan Methodist Church in 1874 and subsequently using the building as their Sunday School from 1874 to 1882, and their parsonage from 1893 to 1921.

Royal Coachman

The property located at 1 Main Street North, formerly known as the Kirk Hotel or Kirk House and currently known as The Royal Coachman, is comprised of a two-and-a-half storey brick commercial building constructed circa 1889.  The historical value of the property lies in its role as a significant gathering place in the Village of Waterdown, its association with the Great Fire of 1922 and its long-standing connection to the Kirk family.

134 Main Street South

The property located at 134 Main Street South, known as the former Wesleyan Methodist Parsonage, is comprised of a one-and-a-half-storey stone building constructed circa 1857.  The historical value of the property lies in its association with the Wesleyan Methodist Church.  In 1854, Waterdown was chosen as the head of a new Wesleyan Methodist Circuit requiring a home that was central to the minister’s route giving him easy access to the villages charged to him.

8 Margaret Street

The property located at 8 Margaret Street, known as the Reid House, is comprised of a two and-a-half storey wood-frame dwelling believed to have been constructed in two distinct phases, a one-and-a-half storey cross-gabled vernacular farm house constructed circa 1860; and a substantial two-and-a-half storey, hipped roof, Queen Anne influenced front addition constructed circa 1910.

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