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Revolt against woke-ism coming from unusual sources

 

Revolt against woke-ism coming from unusual sources

John Best

There appears to be a growing number of persons, not associated with right wing politics to publicly criticize “woke-ism.” The most recent example was James Carville, the Democratic Strategist from the Clinton era. For Carville the problem is the vocabulary of the woke crowd, which he views as exclusionary and elitist.

“Wokeness is a problem,” Carville told an interviewer, “and we all know it.” The reason is simple: They’ve got a “messaging problem. You ever get the sense that people in faculty lounges in fancy colleges use a different language than ordinary people? They come up with a word like “Latinx” that no one else uses. Or they use a phrase like “communities of color.” I don’t know anyone who speaks like that. I don’t know anyone who lives in a “community of color.” I know lots of white and Black and brown people and they all live in … neighborhoods.

“We won the White House against a world-historical buffoon. And we came within 42,000 votes of losing. We lost congressional seats. We didn’t pick up state legislatures. So let’s not have an argument about whether or not we’re off-key in our messaging. We are. And we’re off because there’s too much jargon and there’s too much esoterica and it turns people off.”

Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Ayaan Hirsi Ali escaped Somalia from an arranged marriage with a distant cousin only to find political asylum in the Netherlands, eventually finding a home in the United States, where she fought for the freedom of women everywhere as well as most widely known for her controversial & critical views around Islam. She told the Website 52 Insights. “When I talk about black Americans, I’m talking about the descendants of slaves, not immigrants like myself. Immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean are doing very well here. Unfortunately, the ones who actually are doing well are the ones who are promoting this idea that our structures, systems and everything is racist. They see racism in everything. So they’ve created a cultural narrative of white people, especially of white heterosexual males, assuming the role of nothing but oppressors, and everyone else is a victim. It’s become more widespread than ever. It’s really a cult. The brainwashing is going all the way down to elementary schools; it’s in high schools, it’s in the workplace; it is everywhere. It’s growing at such an alarming speed, and I underestimated it for a long time.”

Africa Brooke

Zimbabwe-born Africa Brooke is a globally recognized mindset coach, business consultant, podcaster, and speaker. In an open letter entitled “why I’m leaving the cult of wokeness, she writes; “What I’m truly afraid of is existing in a world that forces me to submit to an ideology without question, otherwise I’m to be shamed (or pressured to shame myself) and cast out of the community. A world that tells me that because I inhabit a black body; I will forever be oppressed and at the mercy of some omnipresent monster called ‘whiteness’. That because of the colour of my skin; I am a victim of an inherently racist system by default – and me rejecting the narrative of oppression means that I am in fact, in denial.

“You know, as someone that comes from Zimbabwe, a country where the general population is truly oppressed, it perplexes me that oppression is now being worn as an identity piece in most parts of the West, especially by those who claim to be ‘progressive’*

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