Now Reading
People who used to donate to food banks now using them as clients

 

People who used to donate to food banks now using them as clients

Feed Ontario released its 2020 Hunger Report this week, revealing that even prior to COVID-19, food bank use was on the rise. The pandemic has had a significant effect on all local residents and families, including people who were once in a fairly strong financial situation now, having used up their savings, sold assets, borrowed from friends and family and maxed out credit cards, need help and support. The Burlington Food Bank is receiving requests for food from residents that used to donate to the Food Bank and now they need assistance. See Feed Ontario’s Hunger Report 2020 Highlights here: https://feedontario.ca/hunger-report-2020 .

The Burlington Food Bank is Feed Ontario’s direct member food bank for Burlington and provided ongoing food bank use data to help inform this report. In the year leading up to the onset of COVID-19, the Burlington Food Bank served over 1900 people from approximately 850 households who visited more than 4400 times.

“Throughout 2019 and the early part of 2020 the Burlington Food Bank saw a steady increase of about 15% in the number of households using our service. Approximately 40% of our clients during that time were new users of our Food Bank.” said Robin Bailey, Executive Director, Burlington Food Bank.
“The pandemic has had a significant effect on all of us, it is difficult to hear that people that were once in a fairly strong financial situation had now used up their savings, sold assets, borrowed from friends and family and maxed out credit cards. We are receiving requests for food from Burlington residents that used to donate to the Food Bank and now they need our help.” Baily added

The 2020 Hunger Report identifies that while government benefits and support programs played a significant role in helping food banks to meet surging demand with the onset of COVID-19, there is significant concern as these supports wind down, particularly heading into the cold winter months.
“Here in Burlington, we have seen use of our service increasing again over the last couple of months. We have had a few ‘record breaking’ days for us at the Food Bank, this is something we are quite concerned about as we know the need is greater than we are serving. We have a very supportive community, and we are able to keep up with the demand, we want to make sure that people that haven’t contacted us and could use the help know that their community is here to support them in this difficult time.” — Robin Bailey, Executive Director, Burlington Food Bank

The 2020 Hunger Report also includes a special feature on the impact of COVID-19 on food bank use and vulnerable populations across the province. The Burlington Food Bank was one of five food banks selected to facilitate this survey for the report and interviewed food bank visitors, who participated on a voluntary basis, on the impact that the pandemic is having on their daily lives.
Feed Ontario is calling on the Government of Ontario to provide immediate support to low-income families impacted by the pandemic, including the development of a rent relief or payment program for tenants facing rent arrears or eviction due to COVID-19, as well as the reinstatement of the Emergency Benefit for social assistance recipients.

Further, Feed Ontario is calling on the provincial government to align Ontario’s social assistance rates with the national standard set by CERB, and to invest in strengthening the workforce by developing strong labour laws and policies that benefit hard-working people, including the reinstatement of paid sick days and quality job opportunities that provide a livable wage.

What's Your Reaction?
Don't Agree
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
View Comment (1)
  • Another report, okay, we will see where this goes. I’m thinking it will go the same route that Put Food in the Budget went. No where but on a shelve, collecting dust.

    The problem as I see it is, that those working on the inside have their hands tied. Not for profits, as registered charities cannot do the political work, organizing to affect real change. They just produced fancy reports and many workers on the inside make a good living at the expense of the poor.

    A food bank is a bandaid, it is not a real solution. OW and ODSP have not kept pace with the reality in terms of costs for housing or food, the two most basic human rights.

    The maximum shelter portion for ODSP is only $497.00. Ever wonder why the homeless numbers are growing? People lose everything, all their belongings to serve the out right greed that exists out there. It is worse for those on OW. Many seniors are houseless as well.

    Given the housing market and the fact the many in the working class can no longer afford housing, will see more in the streets. N12 evictions are growing in numbers.

    I have to consider the commentary from other citizens who talk in derogatory terms of those struggling who have nothing but a tent to live in and how those not in that position think and remark nastily. There is no empathy or compassion, just overinflated egos.

    Even the derogatory commentary from certain city councillors shows us, they do not care about the people, only those votes from those few who have money and property.

    Giishpin zagaswe-idiwag giiwi- zhaa
    Giiwi gwayakowe minawa minowe

    Anishinabbe 101
    Basically translate to if you come to the council fire
    You will speak correctly and well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

© 2019 The Bay Observer. All Rights Reserved.

Scroll To Top