It has been less than three years since Ottawa announced that it would eliminate the 25 per cent import duty on foreign-built ships, but already the move has transformed the fleet of vessels plying the great Lakes and visiting ports like Hamilton. The duty, which added more than $10 million to the purchase of a ship built overseas, had been a major barrier standing in the way of Great Lakes shipowners renewing the fleet. A new full Seaway- size dry bulk carrier or petroleum products tanker had not been built in Canada in 25 years.

The average age of a Canadian-flag ship operating in the Great Lakes was 38 years old. Since that duty was lifted Canadian domestic shipowners announced the following: In 2015-16, Montreal-based Fednav Ltd. will add 12 new energy-efficient vessels to its fleet, which will connect the Great Lakes-Seaway region’s ports with overseas markets and facilitate international trade. The ocean-going ships will be 20-25 percent more fuel efficient than their predecessors and will reduce air emissions by the same percentage. These ships will add to three other newly-built, environmentally-advanced vessels — the M/V Federal Yukina and its two sister ships — that began arriving to trade in the region in 2011. The Federal Yukina and Federal Satsuki have both been to the Port of Hamilton. International shipowner Polsteam will have eight new dry bulk vessels hit the Great Lakes by the end of the 2013 shipping season.

The 16,000-deadweight-ton ships were built by Sanfu Ship Engineering in Taizhou, China, and the first of this series, the Regalica, made its maiden voyage in January. Between 2012-2014, Montreal-based Canada Steamship Lines will add four new self-unloading and two gearless bulk carriers to the Canadian Great Lakes fleet. These Trillium-class ships feature new engine technology and hull design to reduce fuel consumption and air emissions and the latest generation in self-unloading equipment to prevent cargo spills and reduce noise in ports, amongst other improvements. CSL’s Baie St. Paul arrived in December 2012 and has already been to the Port of Hamilton. The Whitefish Bay and the Thunder Bay are now sailing from China to the Great Lakes. In 2013 and 2014, St. Catharines-based Algoma Central will add eight new vessels — two of which are owned by the Canadian Wheat Board — to its fleet. These Equinox-class vessels will release 45 percent less emissions than existing motor vessels, and feature freshwater exhaust gas scrubbers which will remove 97 percent of sulfur oxide emissions.. This investment is in addition to the M/V Algoma Mariner, which was christened in Port Colborne, Ontario in 2011.

Four of the Equinox-class ships, which will start arriving in the second half of 2013, will be going to the Port of Hamilton at least twice a month carrying iron ore for ArcelorMittal Dofasco. In 2015-16, Montreal-based Fednav Ltd. will add 12 new energy-efficient vessels to its fleet, which will connect the Great Lakes-Seaway region’s ports with overseas markets and facilitate international trade. The ocean-going ships will be 20-25 percent more fuel efficient than their predecessors and will reduce air emissions by the same percentage. These ships will add to three other newly-built, environmentally-advanced vessels — the M/V Federal Yukina and its two sister ships — that began arriving to trade in the region in 2011. The Federal Yukina and Federal Satsuki have both been to the Port of Hamilton. International shipowner Polsteam will have eight new dry bulk vessels hit the Great Lakes by the end of the 2013 shipping season. The 16,000-deadweight-ton ships were built by Sanfu Ship Engineering in Taizhou, China, and the first of this series, the Regalica, made its maiden voyage in January. In total international and domestic shipowners are investing more than $1 billion to bring a new generation of super efficient, environmentally-friendly vessels to the Great Lakes-Seaway System.

Providing a Fresh Perspective for Burlington and Hamilton.

Leave a Reply

  • (not be published)