It was probably unfair that Burlington Mayor Rick Goldring became the focus of discontent over apartment tower intensification in the downtown core. During the campaign he had discussed asking the province to ease up on its intensification targets. But in the end, there was a wave of voter dissatisfaction and anxiety that was too strong to overcome and not only Goldring, but two other long time Burlington council incumbents were voted out. It was the nastiest campaign ever seen in Burlington and probably ends forever the image of Burlington politics as polite and a little boring. Mayor-elect Marianne Meed Ward appears to have a council mostly composed of like-minded advocates of slower growth, but they will still face the realities that developers can appeal to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal, formerly the OMB; and while LPAT is seen to be less developer-friendly than its predecessor, the city will lose some of its zoning battles. Additionally we still believe that, with seven members, Burlington Council is too small to deal effectively with the issues of a growing city. The issue will only be exacerbated with the number of new faces around the table.

Providing a Fresh Perspective for Burlington and Hamilton.

One Comment to: Burlington Spoke

  1. William

    November 10th, 2018

    Once again the Hamilton media shows how out of touch it is on Burlington affairs. The Hamilton media treats Goldring like a man-child, never holding him responsible for his actions as if he’s not old enough to know better. Asking the province to change the intensification targets was a smoke screen he used to hide his bad decisions to change the downtown plan that would have taken Burlington WELL BEYOND the province’s targets. No one put a gun to his head – he simply went along with what staff put in front of him while tuning out of the public, saying we are afraid of change. Good riddance

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